Joaquin Phoenix as Napoleon Bonaparte, crowning himself Emperor, in Ridley Scott's "Napoleon"
ManOfTheCenturyMovie News ‘Napoleon’ trailer: Joaquin Phoenix crowns himself emperor in Ridley Scott’s Epic

‘Napoleon’ trailer: Joaquin Phoenix crowns himself emperor in Ridley Scott’s Epic



Joaquin Phoenix as Napoleon Bonaparte, crowning himself Emperor, in Ridley Scott's "Napoleon"

“Success is the most convincing talker in the world,” Napoleon Bonaparte once said. And a blockbuster trailer can sell you a movie even in the middle of an extremely crowded awards season. Watch the first trailer for ‘Napoleon’, Ridley Scott’s epic about the French emperor, who conquered most of Europe in the early 19th century. Watch it below.

Starring Joaquin Phoenix as the general turned dictator, the film promises an epic scale not seen since Scott in some time. Perhaps not since “Kingdom of Heaven,” or even its last pairing with Phoenix, 2000’s “Gladiator.” There are massive armies arrayed in battle, sneering crowds ready to watch Marie Antoinette’s execution during the Reign of Terror, and even the pyramids used for target practice – yes, something that Bonaparte, a Corsican who rose from nothing to be the most all-powerful figure in Europe over the centuries, in his recklessness actually allowed to take place during his invasion of the ‘Egypt.

Initially pixie-haired Vanessa Kirby plays Josephine, his mistress and eventual wife, who was arguably Napoleon’s closest confidant as he installed puppet rulers in Italy and Spain, marched on Russia, and finally met his match when all the remaining powers of Europe ranged against him.

“Napoleon” is a film that Scott has been talking about for some time. Given its impressive production values, it’s no surprise that it’s a co-production between Sony and Apple TV+, the latter willing to finance projects that could put other studio executives to shame (see “Killers of the Flower Moon” and the upcoming series “Masters of the air”.)

A Napoleon film had long been the dream of Stanley Kubrick, who was immersed in pre-production on the project in the late 1960s and early 1970s before finally abandoning it. Charlie Chaplin’s original idea for ‘The Great Dictator’ was for it to be a Napoleon film, and evidence photos of him in costume exist, before the rising tide of European fascism in the 1930s turned him towards a story set in a contemporary moment that made fun of Hitler and Mussolini. What remains as the definitive account of the general’s life is Abel Gance’s six-hour silent film “Napoleon,” from 1927. Will Scott’s film change that?

The film is released exclusively in theaters this Thanksgiving. Watch the trailer below.

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